Running a tournament can be easier than you think.

We had a successful turnout! 

Compared with the last event, more people turned up for our local tournament than before!  The T.O. (tournament organizer) told me at least 50 people were going to show up, but in reality only about half as much were there.  At least there were new faces that came to test their mettle against the best in town.  There's still undiscovered talent lying around here!

I didn't enter any of the four tournaments, instead I spent my entire time running brackets and making sure everything was running smoothly.  It's never a good idea to participate if you're the only one running brackets — sometimes there'll be setups with no one playing, which leads to lost time.
 

Don't get me wrong, I was really tempted to join in.  It's just not feasible, running four tournaments at the same time…

*****

There were alot of excellent matches that day.  My friend Shyang had three nail-biting rounds, two of which were against some guys from KC (who are seasoned players who've been to tournaments all over the midwest for several years now).  This was Shyang's first tourney.  I asked him how it felt, putting it on the line and fighting it out with strangers for the first time and he said he felt calm.  Calm.
 

When I went to my first tourney, I was a nervous wreck!  That's pretty impressive, staying as calm as he was…maybe he's a born professional?  Could he be the Daigo of our generation!?

The other great match of the day was watching Phong and Jude go at it during the winner's finals for Street Fighter 4.  I've never seen him play so well, not even during our hookups at his house.  So many shenanigans!  Jude was kind enough to post up the videos on his youtube account, here's one of their matches:

Phong (Zangief) vs Jude (Gen)

Good stuff.

For anyone who wants to run their own tournament, I highly suggest using a program called Tournament Maker.  It has programmable brackets that can be adjusted on the fly — all you need to do is insert the name of the participants as they enter.  You can set up multiple tournaments too, in case you have more than one featured game, and the best part is that when the results are finished the software will automatically calculate the cash prize for you.  Awesome program!

And finally, some tips for beginners hoping to run their own tournaments:

  • Advertise, advertise, advertise.  The internet is your friend!
  • Plan out the venue at least a month in advance in order to give potential competitors time to schedule in advance.
  • If you're doing this for fun, the most common format is arranging a cash pot.  For example, everyone who enters pays a set fee, and the 1st and 2nd place (or 3rd place if you're up to it) winners will recieve a portion of the total pot.  The common standard for splitting the pot is 70/30.
  • If you're not doing this for fun, then you can consider charging a venue fee to help with room costs on top of the entry fee to help turn a profit.
  • Study the rules for each game you feature.  There's a tournament standard for all games; so make sure you enforce those rules when necessary and read up as much as you can.
  • Don't give refunds.  It messes up the prize total for the rest, plus if a player decides to enter a tournament but then loses, that's to be expected and is NOT a legitimate reason for a refund.  If you don't feel confident to enter, then don't!
  • Don't be afraid to ask for help.  Better yet, ask for help from friends if you can.  Practice makes perfect!
  • Most importantly, don't forget to be friendly and have fun! People will respect you if you show them respect too.

Here's some more pictures of the event.  Our next one will be later this year, so I'm looking forward to doing this again!

2nd Floor of the venue.Warm ups.KC guys hanging with my friends.Big wad of cash.

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